Knotted, or pile rugs

(Posted on 24/09/13)

Knotted, or pile rugs

In oriental rugs the pile is created by tying a short length of yarn around two adjacent warp strands so that the ends of the yarn protrude upwards to form the surface (or pile) of the rug.  This process is referred to as 'knotting', because when the weft and warp strands are beaten together to hold the yarn in place, a securely tied knot is formed.  In oriental rugs, every knot - which corresponds to two individual strands of pile - is tied by hand, and skilled weaver can tie something in the region of a thousand knots per hour.  The knotting process always begins at the side of the rug (after the selvedges have been secured) by tying knot on each pair of warp strands in a horizontal direction across the width of the rug.  When one horizontal line of knots has been tide, they are beaten together with the weaver's comb before starting on the next line, and this continues upwards until the rug has been completed.